Keynote Speakers



  • Moshe Y. Vardi (Rice University)

  • Title:


    A Logical Revolution


    Abstract:


    Mathematical logic was developed in an effort to provide formal foundations for mathematics. In this quest, which ultimately failed, logic begat computer science, yielding both computers and theoretical computer science. But then logic turned out to be a disappointment as foundations for computer science, as almost all decision problems in logic are either unsolvable or intractable. Starting from the mid 1970s, however, there has been a quiet revolution in logic in computer science, and problems that are theoretically undecidable or intractable were shown to be quite feasible in practice. This talk describes the rise, fall, and rise of logic in computer science, describing several modern applications of logic to computing, include databases, hardware design, and software engineering.


    Bio:


    Moshe Y. Vardi is the George Distinguished Service Professor in Computational Engineering and Director of the Ken Kennedy Institute for Information Technology at Rice University. He received his Ph.D. from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 1981. He is the recipient of three IBM Outstanding Innovation Awards, the ACM SIGACT Goedel Prize, the ACM Kanellakis Award, the ACM SIGMOD Codd Award, the Blaise Pascal Medal, the IEEE Computer Society Goode Award, the EATCS Distinguished Achievements Award, and the Southeastern Universities Research Association's Distinguished Scientist Award. He is the author and co-author of over 500 papers, as well as two books: “Reasoning about Knowledge” and “Finite Model Theory and Its Applications”. He is a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery, the American Association for Artificial Intelligence, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the European Association for Theoretical Computer Science, the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers, and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. He is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering and National Academy of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Science, the European Academy of Science, and Academia Europaea. He holds honorary doctorates from the Saarland University in Germany, Orleans University in France, UFRGS in Brazil, and the University of Liege in Belgium. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the Communications of the ACM.



  • David S. Rosenblum (National University of Singapore)

  • Title:


    The Challenges of Probabilistic Thinking


    Abstract:


    At ASE 2016, I gave a keynote talk entitled “The Power of Probabilistic Thinking”, in which I argued the benefits of applying probabilistic modeling and reasoning to problems in software engineering, and the advantages of this approach over the more "absolutist" approach afforded by reasoning based solely on Boolean logic.
    In this talk I will discuss some of the challenges in applying a probabilistic viewpoint. Where do the probabilities for a model come from? What if they’re incorrect? What if the behavior of the system to be modeled is imprecise, approximat e, noisy, or otherwise uncertain? These challenges, and others, have informed my research in probabilistic verification over the past dozen years, and I have applied a variety of techniques to model and reason about the complexities and "messiness" that arise in real-world software systems using a probabilistic viewpoint.


    Bio:


    David S. Rosenblum is Provost's Chair Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the National University of Singapore. He received his PhD in 1988 from the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He is currently the Director of the NUS-Singtel Cyber Security Research and Development Laboratory, which is part of the NUS Smart Nation Research Cluster. He also directs theFelicitous Computing Institute, and he is a member of the NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering. From 2013 to 2016 he was Dean of the NUS School of Computing. His research has addressed a wide range of problems spanning the breadth of the software development life cycle, including software specification, architecture, design, testing, analysis and maintenance, as well as problems underlying the processes that guide large software projects. His current research focuses on probabilistic verification of systems, and the design and validation of mobile, context-aware adaptive systems for ubiquitous computing and the Internet of Things. In 1997 he received aCAREER Award from the US National Science Foundation for his work on distributed component-based software, and from 2004-2009 he held a Wolfson Research Merit Award from the Royal Society. He is a Fellow of the ACM and IEEE and has received two "test of time awards" for his research. He was previously an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, and he has served as Member-at-Large, Vice Chair, Chair and Past Chair of the ACM Special Interest Group on Software Engineering(ACM SIGSOFT).



  • Yi Wang (Uppsala University)

  • Title:


    Towards Customizable CPS: Composability, Efficiency and Predictability


    Abstract:


    Today, many industrial products are defined by software, and therefore customizableby installing new applications on demand - their functionalities are implemented by software and can be modified and extended by software updates. This trend towards customizable products is extending into all domains of IT, including Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) such as cars, robotics, and medical devices. However, these systems are often highly safety-critical. The current state-of-practice allows hardly any modifications once safety-critical systems are put in operation. This is due to the lack of techniques to preserve crucial safety conditions for the modified system, which severely restricts the benefits of software.
    This work aims at new paradigms and technologies for the design and safe software updates of CPS at operation-time - subject to stringent timing constraints, dynamic workloads, and limited resources on complex computing platforms. Essentially there are three key challenges: Composability, Resource-Efficiency and Predictability to enable modular, incremental and safe software updates over system life-time in use. We present research directions to address these challenges: (1) Open architectures and implementation schemes for building composable systems, (2) Fundamental issues in real-time scheduling aiming at a theory of multi-resource (inc. multiprocessor) scheduling, and (3) New-generation techniques and tools for fully separated verification of timing and functional properties of real-time systems with significantly improved efficiency and scalability. The tools shall support not only verification, but also code generation tailored for both cosimulation (interfaced) with existing design tools such as Open Modelica (for modeling and simulation of physical components), and deployment on given computing platforms.


    Bio:


    Wang Yi is professor (chair holder) of Embedded Systems at Uppsala University, with a Ph.D. in Computer Science (1991) from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. He is a Member of Academy of Europe (Section of Informatics) and a Fellow of the IEEE. His interests are in models, algorithms and software tools for building and analyzing computer systems in a systematic manner to ensure predictable behaviors. Over the years, he has worked on various topics including concurrent and real-time programming, process algebras, timed automata, model checking, real-time, embedded and distributed systems, multiprocessor systems, real-time operating systems, and complexity issues in real-time scheduling. The most important contributions of Wang Yi concern Formal Modeling and Verification, and Real-Time Systems as well as Complexity Issues in Scheduling Theory. With his co-authors, he was awarded with the CAV 2013 Award for contributions to model checking of real-time systems, in particular the development of UPPAAL, the foremost tool suite for automated analysis and verification of real-time systems. For contributions to real-time systems, with his students, he received Best Paper Awards of RTSS 2015, ECRTS 2015, DATE 2013 and RTSS 2009, Outstanding Paper Award of ECRTS 2012 and Best Tool Paper Award of ETAPS 2002. He is on the steering committee of ESWEEK, ACM EMSOFT (co-chair), ACM LCTES, and FORMATS. He serves frequently on Technical Program Committees for a large number of conferences, and he is an editor for several journals including IEEE Embedded Systems Letters, IEEE Design and Test, Journal of Computer Science and Technology and IEEE Transactions on Computers.